Memories of the Holocaust on display in multimedia art exhibit in Farmington Hills WITH VIDEO

Published: Wednesday, information pills treatment March 13, order 2013

By MEGAN SEMERAZ
Of The Oakland Press

Artist Fay Grajower and Stephen Goldman, executive director at the Holocaust Memorial Center in Farmington Hills, stand with some of Grajower’s artwork that will be part of the “Where the Past Meets the Future” exhibit. The Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Family Campus will host University of Illinois at Chicago professor Dr. Mimis Cohen for a presentation called “Heroism & Humanity: A reminder Once More About the Holocaust and the Greek Jews” at 3 p.m. on March 17. Cohen was born and raised in Greece after World War II. His parents survived the Holocaust by hiding in Christian homes. (The Oakland Press/TIM THOMPSON)

A new multimedia art exhibit called “Where the Past Meets the Future” provides insight about the second generation of Holocaust survivors, and will be featured at the Holocaust Memorial Center Zekelman Family Campus starting this month.

Boston artist Fay Grajower used her memories of her mother and sibling’s experiences to work through issues from the past. She commonly uses metaphors in her artwork.

Director of the Museum Stephen Goldman says the artist creates “memoryscapes,” using words, colors and symbols.

On display will be 140 small-scale paintings and mixed-media pieces that revisit the Jewish life in Poland before the Holocaust on display. In addition, two large-scale paintings — oil, vinyl and other mixed-media pieces will also be in the exhibit.

Read more here.

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LATE APPLICANTS FUND ESTABLISHED BY THE CLAIMS CONFERENCE FOR HEIRS WHO MISSED DEADLINES TO CLAIM EAST GERMAN PROPERTIES

Fund will pay certain heirs to Jewish-owned properties in former East Germany recovered by Claims Conference

February 19, nurse 2013 — The Claims Conference has established a Late Applicants Fund (“LAF”) of €50 million to accept applications from certain heirs of former Jewish owners of properties and assets located in the former East Germany for which the Claims Conference received proceeds as Successor Organization under the German Property Law of 1990.
The Claims Conference has published on its website, www.claimscon.org, a list of the properties/assets received by the Claims Conference as of the date of publication, and such assets for which claims by the Claims Conference are still pending under the German Property Restitution Law, including the name of the former owners and/or businesses, as well as the addresses of the properties/assets.
The detailed rules of the LAF, applications, and other information are also on the Claims Conference website, www.claimscon.org. Applications will be accepted through December 31, 2014, a total of two years.
In 1990, the new democratic government of East Germany introduced legislation to restitute property that had been nationalized by the former East German Communist regime. Even before the reunification of East and West Germany was finalized, the Claims Conference was able to negotiate that this legislation included the restitution of formerly Jewish-owned property lost in the Holocaust.
As a result, original Jewish owners and heirs gained the right to file claims for property in the former East Germany. The German government imposed application deadlines of Dec. 31, 1992 for real estate claims and June 30, 1993 for movable property claims. Tens of thousands of owners and heirs filed claims and recovered assets under the legislation  that resulted from these negotiations carried out by the Claims Conference.
The Claims Conference also negotiated to become the legal successor to individual Jewish property and property of dissolved Jewish communities and organizations in the former East Germany that went unclaimed after Dec. 31, 1992. Had the Claims Conference not taken this step, formerly Jewish-owned assets that remained unclaimed after the German-imposed filing deadline would have remained with the owners at the time or reverted to the German government.
The resulting Successor Organization of the Claims Conference sells recovered property or receives compensation and has been responsible for more than $1 billion in grants, primarily to social welfare agencies around the world that assist the neediest and most vulnerable Jewish victims of Nazi persecution. These grants provide the major funds to help provide a social safety net for Nazi victims around the world, providing homecare, food, and medicine for Holocaust survivors.
The Claims Conference established the Goodwill Fund in 1994 in order to enable former Jewish owners and their heirs to receive a payment even after the German deadlines of 1992/1993. Through the Goodwill Fund, certain former owners and heirs could apply for the proceeds of properties or compensation payments that the German restitution authorities had awarded to the Claims Conference. After several extensions (see attached), the Goodwill Fund’s final application deadline was March 30, 2004, with amendments made in 2009 and 2010 for certain heirs.  With the time for the original filing period and the Claims Conference Goodwill Fund, original owners of and heirs to property in the former East Germany have had the longest filing period of any Holocaust restitution program of any asset (immovable property, insurance, bank accounts, etc.).  This final Late Applicants Fund adds an additional two years.
The Claims Conference commitment to assisting close relatives who missed the deadline is borne out by the fact that it had, as of December 31, 2011, paid approximately €637 million under the Goodwill Fund to original owners or their heirs. The Claims Conference had also set aside approximately €47 million (approximately $60 million) for future payments from the Goodwill Fund, and a further €16 million (approximately $21 million) has been designated for Goodwill Fund and Other Uses.
With the recovery of properties coming to a close, the Claims Conference needs certain knowledge of the Successor Organization funds available to it for future support of homecare, medical care, food and other assistance to Holocaust victims. The establishment of the LAF, the final fund from which payments will be made to heirs, will enable the Claims Conference to ascertain with certainty the availability of Successor Organization funds for these services.
LAF applications can be filed directly with the Claims Conference for no fee. There is no need for applicants to pay a fee to any party.
The LAF will be open for a period of two years commencing on January 1, 2013 (“Filing Period”).  Upon the expiration of the Filing Period, the Claims Conference shall determine the payments that eligible heirs will receive.  This determination will be based on a number of factors detailed on the Claims Conference website.
It is not known when payments will be able to be made to eligible applicants.
All communications regarding the Late Applicants Fund should be submitted to:
Claims Conference Successor Organization
Sophienstrasse 26
D-60487 Frankfurt am Main, Germany
Fax: 49-69-97-07-08-11

Email: claims-conference-laf@claimscon.org

MARTIN BECK MATUŠTÍK PRESENTS

OUT OF SILENCE: REPAIR ACROSS GENERATIONS
THE ASSOCIATION FOR CRITICAL THEORY (ACT)
with the generous support of the
DOCTORAL STUDENTS COUNCIL (DSC)
Present
MARTIN BECK MATUŠTÍK
OUT OF SILENCE: REPAIR ACROSS GENERATIONS
WEDNESDAY, doctor MARCH 13
6:30-8:30
CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK GRADUATE CENTER
365 FIFTH AVENUE, online NEW YORK, sildenafil NY
ROOM 5414

JOIN US AS PROFESSOR MARTIN BECK MATUŠTÍK READS FROM HIS NEW MEMOIR, AS HE REFLECTS UPON VARIOUS PHILOSOPHICAL, EXISTENTIAL, AND POLITICAL THEMES, AS SEEN FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF A SECOND GENERATION HOLOCAUST SURVIVOR. DEALING WITH ISSUES OF TRANS-GENERATIONAL MEMORY, REPAIR, AND COMING TO TERMS WITH THE PAST, THIS WORK PROMISES TO BE OF INTEREST TO MANY, IN ITS EXPLORATION OF THEMES THAT
MAKE US ALL HUMAN.

click here for more information: OUTOFSILENCE-CUNYpresentation

 

Director Avi Angel and  NY’s QUAD Cinema have the pleasure of inviting you to a Special Screening of the new documentary
HERE I LEARNED TO LOVE

a film by Avi Angel

Saturday night, March 2nd – 8pm Screening
QUAD Cinema
34 West 13th Street Greenwich Village

 Based on the book Three Mothers for Two Brothers by Itzik Weinberg

” (A) moving evocation of a world gone mad through the eyes of toddlers…”
 – Ronnie Scheib, VARIETY

“A powerful entry in the family-history-as-world-history archives.” 
– Michelle Orange THE VILLAGE VOICE

 “With infinite compassion and sensitivity Avi Angel took two elderly, 
some might even say old,  men on a harrowing and emotionally inconceivable journey. 
The very fact that the brothers are able to lead the story and bring order
 into their lives is one of the great achievements of this excellent film. 
— Ariana Melamed, YNET

Kindly RSVP by 2/25
to 
Anne Borin PR
(212) 586-6367

Join Director Angel for Q&A after the screening

*       *      *      *     *

Ruth Diskin Films and NY’s QUADCINEMA
present  a film by AVI ANGEL­­­
 
HERE I LEARNED TO LOVE
Opens Friday, MARCH 1 – 7
NY’s QUADCINEMA – 34 West 13th Street, NYC
 
“Affecting, imaginatively shot…(A) moving evocation of a world gone mad through the eyes of toddlers…”
 – Ronnie Scheib, VARIETY
“A powerful entry in the family-history-as-world-history archives” – Michelle Orange THE VILLAGE VOICE

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 Ruth Diskin Films and NY’s QUADCINEMA
present  a film by AVI ANGEL­­­
 
 
“Affecting, imaginatively shot…(A) moving evocation of a world gone mad through the eyes of toddlers…”
 – Ronnie Scheib, VARIETY
“A powerful entry in the family-history-as-world-history archives” – Michelle Orange THE VILLAGE VOICE

 
VARIETY  http://www.villagevoice.com/2012-10-31/film/here-i-learned-to-love-film-review/
 
Based on the book Three Mothers for Two Brothers by Itzik Weinberg
 
Genre: Documentary / 60 minutes / English, French, German, Hebrew, Spanish w/ English subtitles
Directed by: Avi Angel    Produced by: Ido Groner, Debby Bar Shalom, Iris Rosenberg
Synopsis: Shrouded in mystery for more than six decades, this harrowing narrative unfolds in the grip of the Shoah, tracing the survival of two brothers, Itzik Weinberg and Avner Kerem. When they weren’t yet four years old, three women came their rescue: first, their mother in the Krakow Ghetto; then their aunt in Budapest; overrun by Nazis; and, after both women had been murdered, a beautiful stranger who shielded the boys in the shadow of death in Bergen Belsen and after their liberation in the serenity of Montreux, Switzerland.  All this remained hidden. The boys who ultimately found their way to Israel grew up unsure they were even related, although their surviving family always treated them as brothers, speaking cryptically about their “three mothers”. Now in their 70’s, Avner takes Itzik on a journey in search of their true identity–piecing together the story of their survival and the love that rescued them from certain death.
 
DIRECTOR AVI ANGEL WILL BE AT SELECTED SCREENINGS
CHECK QUAD WEBSITE FOR SCHEDULE – www.quadcinema.com/coming-soon
 
SPECIAL APPEARANCES ON SUNDAY, 3/3
REPRESENTATIVES FROM ISOPC – INTERNATIONAL STUDY OF ORGANIZED PERSECUTION OF CHILDREN,
 A PROJECT OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH — WILL JOIN DIRECTOR ANGEL IN DISCUSSION:
DR. EVA FOGELMAN (5PM SHOWING) AND DR. HELENE BASS-WICHELLHAUS (7 PM SHOWING)
 
HERE I LEARNED TO LOVE Opens Friday, MARCH 1
QUADCINEMA  34 West 13th Street / (212) 255-2243 / quadcinema@aol.com
 
NYC CONTACT: ANNE BORIN PR – annefilm@aol.com / (212) 586-6367